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We are pleased to announce that Elizabeth James-Perry has kindly consented to be a keynote speaker at the 39th annual AIW, in Ghent, Belgium. Elizabeth James-Perry is an enrolled citizen of the Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribe on the island of Noepe (Marthas Vineyard). She graduated with honors in Marine Biology from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth in 2001, and also completed coursework at Cornell University’s  satellite campus, Shoals Marine Laboratory, and at the Rhode Island School of Design. She has in-shore and off-shore commercial fisheries research experience, and was recently honored to be a 38th Voyager onboard the historic Charles W. Morgan refurbished whaling vessel, as a descendant of the original Gay Head crewmembers.   She recounted some of her Wampanoag families’ nineteenth century whaling history in Nancy Shoemaker’s Living with Whales, and published her own research in Dawnland Voices 2.0.

Elizabeth has been a traditional and contemporary artist for more than twenty years; her artwork grows out of Northeastern Woodlands Algonquian artistic expressions. To support her natural weaving and dyes, she wild-harvests and processes her own sea clams, common plants and barks, while growing some plants that have now become rare in Massachusetts woods. In 2014 Elizabeth had the honor of receiving a Traditional Arts Fellowship from Massachusetts Cultural Council, and the Rebecca Blunk Award in 2015. As a member of a Nation that has long lived on and harvested the sea, Elizabeth’s is a perspective that combines a strong sense of Native sovereignty, the arts, an appreciation for Native storytelling and TEK (traditional environmental knowledge), in her ways of relating to Native life on the North Atlantic. Elizabeth James-Perry has been employed for ten years as a Senior Cultural Resource Monitor for the Aquinnah Wampanoag Tribal Historic Preservation Office, and is a member of the Culture and Heritage Committee at the United and Southeastern Tribal Conference. She monitors archeology, consults on Wampanoag-subject exhibits, documentary films, and writes for collaborative King Philips War projects supported by National Parks Service Battlefield Grants. She lives in Dartmouth, Massachusetts.

For more information, please see her website at: www.elizabethjamesperry.com